Let’s take a look at a basic trigger.config.ts file. This is generated for you when you follow the quick start guide. This file is used to configure your project and how it’s bundled.

trigger.config.ts
import type { TriggerConfig } from "@trigger.dev/sdk/v3";

export const config: TriggerConfig = {
  //Your project ref (you can see it on the Project settings page in the dashboard)
  project: "proj_gtcwttqhhtlasxgfuhxs",
  retries: {
    //If you want to retry a task in dev mode (when using the CLI)
    enabledInDev: false,
    //the default retry settings. Used if you don't specify on a task.
    default: {
      maxAttempts: 3,
      minTimeoutInMs: 1000,
      maxTimeoutInMs: 10000,
      factor: 2,
      randomize: true,
    },
  },
  //The paths for your trigger folders
  triggerDirectories: ["./trigger"],
};

Most of the time you don’t need to change anything in this file, or if you do then we will tell you when you the run the CLI command.

Global initialization

You can run code before any task is run by adding a init function to your trigger.config.ts file.

trigger.config.ts
import type { TriggerConfig } from "@trigger.dev/sdk/v3";

export const config: TriggerConfig = {
  //..other stuff
  init: async (payload, { ctx }) => {
    console.log("I run before any task is run");
  },
};

You’ll have access to the run payload and the context object. Currently you cannot return anything from this function.

Lifecycle functions

You can add lifecycle functions to get notified when any task starts, succeeds, or fails using onStart, onSuccess and onFailure:

trigger.config.ts
import type { TriggerConfig } from "@trigger.dev/sdk/v3";

export const config: TriggerConfig = {
  //..other stuff
  onSuccess: async (payload, output, { ctx }) => {
    console.log("Task succeeded", ctx.task.id);
  },
  onFailure: async (payload, error, { ctx }) => {
    console.log("Task failed", ctx.task.id);
  },
  onStart: async (payload, { ctx }) => {
    console.log("Task started", ctx.task.id);
  },
};

Read more about task lifecycle functions in the tasks overview.

Instrumentations

We use OpenTelemetry (OTEL) for our run logs. This means you get a lot of information about your tasks with no effort. But you probably want to add more information to your logs. For example, here’s all the Prisma calls automatically logged:

The run log

Here we add Prisma and OpenAI instrumentations to your trigger.config.ts file.

trigger.config.ts
import type { TriggerConfig } from "@trigger.dev/sdk/v3";
import { PrismaInstrumentation } from "@prisma/instrumentation";
import { OpenAIInstrumentation } from "@traceloop/instrumentation-openai";

export const config: TriggerConfig = {
  //..other stuff
  instrumentations: [new PrismaInstrumentation(), new OpenAIInstrumentation()],
};

There is a huge library of instrumentations you can easily add to your project like this.

Some ones we recommend:

PackageDescription
@opentelemetry/instrumentation-undiciLogs all fetch calls (inc. Undici fetch)
@opentelemetry/instrumentation-fsLogs all file system calls
@opentelemetry/instrumentation-httpLogs all HTTP calls
@prisma/instrumentationLogs all Prisma calls, you need to enable tracing
@traceloop/instrumentation-openaiLogs all OpenAI calls

Syncing environment variables

You can sync environment variables from another service using the resolveEnvVars function. Read the docs for more information.

ESM-only packages

We’ll let you know when running the CLI dev command if this is a problem. Some packages are ESM-only so they don’t work directly from CJS when using Node.js. In that case you need to add them to the dependenciesToBundle array in your trigger.config.ts file.

trigger.config.ts
import type { TriggerConfig } from "@trigger.dev/sdk/v3";

export const config: TriggerConfig = {
  //..other stuff
  //either regex or strings of package names
  dependenciesToBundle: [/@sindresorhus/, "escape-string-regexp"],
};

Prisma (and other generators)

Prisma works by generating a client from your prisma.schema file. This means you need to do a couple of things to get it to work with Trigger:

1

package.json postinstall `prisma generate`

{
  "scripts": {
    "postinstall": "prisma generate"
  }
}

Anything you put in postinstall will be run as part of the install step. This is how Next.js recommends you set up Prisma anyway.

2

Add prisma and the schema to trigger.config.ts

trigger.config.ts
import type { TriggerConfig } from "@trigger.dev/sdk/v3";

export const config: TriggerConfig = {
  //..other stuff

  // using the default path
  additionalFiles: ["./prisma/schema.prisma"],
  // or a custom path, for example in a monorepo
  additionalFiles: ["../../custom/path/to/schema.prisma"],

  additionalPackages: ["[email protected]"],
};

This tells Trigger to bundle the Prisma client and the schema file.

TypeORM support

We support using TypeORM with Trigger. You can use decorators in your entities and then use them in your tasks. Here’s an example:

orm/index.ts
import "reflect-metadata";
import { DataSource } from "typeorm";
import { Entity, Column, PrimaryColumn } from "typeorm";

@Entity()
export class Photo {
  @PrimaryColumn()
  id!: number;

  @Column()
  name!: string;

  @Column()
  description!: string;

  @Column()
  filename!: string;

  @Column()
  views!: number;

  @Column()
  isPublished!: boolean;
}

export const AppDataSource = new DataSource({
  type: "postgres",
  host: "localhost",
  port: 5432,
  username: "postgres",
  password: "postgres",
  database: "my-database",
  entities: [Photo],
  synchronize: true,
  logging: false,
});

And then in your trigger.config.ts file you can initialize the datasource using the onStart lifecycle function option:

trigger.config.ts
import type { TriggerConfig } from "@trigger.dev/sdk/v3";
import { AppDataSource } from "@/trigger/orm";

export const config: TriggerConfig = {
  // ... other options here
  onStart: async (payload, { ctx }) => {
    await AppDataSource.initialize();
  },
};

Now you are ready to use this in your tasks:

import { task } from "@trigger.dev/sdk/v3";
import { AppDataSource, Photo } from "./orm";

export const taskThatUsesDecorators = task({
  id: "task-that-uses-decorators",
  run: async (payload: { message: string }) => {
    console.log("Creating a photo...");

    const photo = new Photo();
    photo.id = 2;
    photo.name = "Me and Bears";
    photo.description = "I am near polar bears";
    photo.filename = "photo-with-bears.jpg";
    photo.views = 1;
    photo.isPublished = true;

    await AppDataSource.manager.save(photo);
  },
});

Troubleshooting

If you have an issue with bundling checkout our troubleshooting guide.